Friday, September 27, 2013

Avatar, Book One

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine
Avatar, Book One by S.D. Perry
Published May
2001
Read April 23rd 2013


Previous book (Deep Space Nine): A Stitch in Time
Next book (Deep Space Nine): Avatar, Book Two


Purchase Avatar, Book One from Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk

Avatar is also available as part of an omnibus, Twist of Faith, containing the first four novels of the DS9 relaunch:

Purchase Twist of Faith from Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk
NOTE: This volume contains Avatar: Book One, Avatar: Book Two, Section 31: AbyssGateways: Demons of Air and Darkness, and the novella "Horn and Ivory" from Gateways: What Lay Beyond

Spoilers ahead for Avatar and the Deep Space Nine relaunch!

From the back cover:
RETURN TO THE EDGE OF THE FINAL FRONTIER 
In the aftermath of a war that brought the Alpha Quadrant to the brink of destruction, Starbase Deep Space 9 -- the galaxy's nexus of scientific and military intrigue -- is once more the flashpoint of impending Armageddon as a surprise attack cripples the station, killing hundreds and threatening the fragile new peace. 
Colonel Kira Nerys and the survivors -- together with several controversial new officers -- are all who stand against the outbreak of a new war and a terrible doom tied to the unborn child of Captain Benjamin Sisko. 
Elsewhere, Captain Jean-Luc Picard and the crew of the Starship Enterprise make a startling discovery...one that will affect the destiny of an entire civilization and forever change the lives of those aboard Deep Space 9.


My thoughts:

As a Star Trek fan, each of the series has a special place in my heart. As much as I love TOS and TNG (and even Voyager and Enterprise), when I want compelling, realistic drama with incredibly fleshed-out and dynamic characters, I turn to Deep Space Nine. To me, DS9 was the epitome of smart drama. Therefore, when it was announced that the story of DS9 would continue in the novels, I was obviously thrilled. The chance to return to Bajor, the wormhole, and the galactic politics that were the hallmark of Deep Space Nine? Sign me up! Although things are very obviously changed from the series, I was excited to catch up with the familiar characters still on Deep Space Nine: Colonel Kira, Dr. Bashir, Ezri Dax, Jake Sisko, Kassidy Yates, Quark, and Nog, as well as new faces such as Lieutenant Ro Laren (imported from The Next Generation), Andorian science officer Thirishar ch'Thane, and Commander Elias Vaughn.

Book one of Avatar does a reasonably good job of reintroducing the world of DS9. In many ways, what Quark said at the end of "What You Leave Behind" holds true: "The more things change, the more they stay the same." However, there is enough of a change that this is very clearly a new chapter in the DS9 saga. Colonel Kira is now in command of the station, and the disappearance of Benjamin Sisko weighs heavily on both his son and the mother of his unborn child. The unearthing of an ancient and controversial prophecy kicks things into motion as Jake Sisko comes to believe that he has a role to play in bringing his father home. Meanwhile, a Jem'Hadar attack on the station may be a precursor to renewed Dominion agression, and the Alpha Quadrant is once again placed on high alert.

DS9 is attacked by three Jem'Hadar fighters, which may lead to a renewal of hostilities between the Dominion and the Alpha Quadrant powers.
Particularly enjoyable is the introduction of Commander Elias Vaughn. Vaughn almost seems to be following in the path of Benjamin Sisko, in that he may be revealed to have an interesting relationship with the Prophets as well. In the course of the novel, he discovers a long-lost Bajoran Orb, which marks the beginning of what looks to be a profound change in his life. I'm eager to see where these developments lead.

Commander Vaughn discovers the Orb of Memory aboard a disabled Cardassian freighter.
In the end, tensions look to be at a near-breaking point, and another Dominion War could be imminent. There is a lot of set-up here, much of which will of course be paid off in book two. Avatar, Book One is a compelling launch to this new series, and the series itself would prove to be a smart move by Pocket Books, who later decide to do similar "re-launches" for The Next Generation, following Star Trek Nemesis, and Voyager, following its series finale, "Endgame."

Final thoughts:

It's clear from the beginning that the DS9 relaunch has a winning formula, and retains just enough of the original feel of the television series to be a very welcome addition to the world of Star Trek novels. The voices of the remaining original characters are there, and the new characters are compelling enough to earn their place alongside their "old guard" counterparts. Much like most of the Deep Space Nine television series, Avatar, Book One was a tightly plotted and engaging story, the conclusion to which I am looking forward to in book two!

Further resources:

TrekBBS review and discussion thread for Avatar, Book One
Podcast: Literary Treks 10: Deep Space Nine Season Eight - discussion of Avatar, Book One

Also by S.D. Perry:

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Avatar, Book Two of Two (2001)
Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Rising Son (2003)
Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Unity (2003)
Star Trek: Terok Nor: Night of the Wolves with Britta Dennison (2008)
Star Trek: Terok Nor: Dawn of the Eagles with Britta Dennison(2008)
Star Trek: Inception with Britta Dennison (2010)

My next read:

I've just finished the latest new release, Una McCormack's entry in The Fall, The Crimson Shadow. Look for my review in the coming week!

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Fall sale! These are the Voyages: TOS, Season One



From now until October 31, These are the Voyages: TOS, Season One by Marc Cushman is on sale at Amazon.com for only $27.95! Click here to order this amazing volume. And if you haven't already, check out my glowing review!


Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Original pitch for Dayton Ward's From History's Shadow

Here's an interesting piece: On his blog, Dayton Ward has revealed the first part of the original pitch for the story that would one day become From History's Shadow. Rather than the Original Series story it became, Aliens Among Us was initially pitched as a Deep Space Nine story. How would it have unfolded? Check it out at The Fog of Ward, Dayton's personal blog.

My review of From History's Shadow is available, and you can purchase it (and many more Trek novels) from Amazon by clicking the links below!

Purchase From History's Shadow from Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk

Monday, September 23, 2013

The Fall: Peaceable Kingdoms cover unveiled

The cover and back-cover blurb for Dayton Ward's The Fall, Book Five: Peaceable Kingdoms have just been released in a preview on StarTrek.com. Check them out below!


The United Federation of Planets takes the first hopeful steps beyond the uncertainty and tragedy that has overshadowed recent events in the Alpha Quadrant. Even as elements of the Typhon Pact have been implicated in a devastating attack against the Federation, William Riker holds key knowledge of the true criminals—a revelation that could threaten the fragile Federation-Cardassian alliance. Time is running out to apprehend those responsible for the brutal crime. 
Questions and concerns also continue to swell around the ambitious Bajoran Ishan Anjar, who has risen through the ranks of the Federation Council while using the recent bloodshed to further a belligerent, hawkish political agenda against the Typhon Pact. Riker must dispatch his closest friend, Captain Jean-Luc Picard, in a desperate attempt to uncover the truth. But as Picard and the Enterprise crew pursue the few remaining clues, Riker must act on growing suspicions that someone within Ishan’s inner circle has been in league with the criminals from the very beginning…

Peaceable Kingdoms can be pre-ordered from Amazon.com, Amazon.ca, and Amazon.co.uk.

With the release of this latest cover, the covers of all five books of The Fall have now been revealed! Below are previews of each of the previous four books, and in the case of Revelation and Dust, a link to my review and a link to an interview I had the opportunity to do with David R. George III, as well as a link to my interview with Una McCormack for her novel, The Crimson Shadow:



The Fall, Book One: Revelation and Dust 
by David R. George III (Interview at TrekCore.com)

WELCOME TO THE NEW DEEP SPACE 9 
After the destruction of the original space station by a rogue faction of the Typhon Pact, Miles O’Brien and Nog have led the Starfleet Corps of Engineers in designing and constructing a larger, more advanced starbase in the Bajoran system. Now, as familiar faces such as Benjamin Sisko, Kasidy Yates, Ezri Dax, Odo, and Quark arrive at the new station, Captain Ro Laren will host various heads of state at an impressive dedication ceremony. The dignitaries include not only the leaders of allies—such as Klingon Chancellor Martok, Ferengi Grand Nagus Rom, the Cardassian castellan, and the Bajoran first minister—but also those of rival powers, such as the Romulan praetor and the Gorn imperator. But as Ro’s crew prepares to open DS9 to the entire Bajor Sector and beyond, disaster looms. A faction has already set in action a shocking plan that, if successful, will shake the Alpha and Beta Quadrants to the core. 
And what of Kira Nerys, lost aboard a runabout when the Bajoran wormhole collapsed? In the two years that have passed during construction of the new Deep Space 9, there have been no indica­tions that the Celestial Temple, the Prophets, or Kira have sur­vived. But since Ben Sisko once learned that the wormhole aliens exist nonlinearly in time, what does that mean with respect to their fate, or that of the wormhole . . . or of Kira herself?

Order Revelation and Dust from Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk



The Fall, Book Two: The Crimson Shadow 
by Una McCormack (Interview at TrekCore.com)

Cardassia Prime is home to a prideful people who, for centuries, forged alliances with those they believed would strengthen them and their place in the Alpha Quadrant, and expanded their empire at great cost to other worlds. For generations, dissenting voices were silenced by either fear or an early grave. When their wartime ally, the Dominion, suddenly turned on them, seeking to transform Cardassia into a tomb for every last member of their race, their old adversary—the United Federation of Planets— put an end to the carnage, and even now works to help rebuild Cardassia Prime.
To celebrate this alliance, the Castellan of the Cardassian Union is to welcome the Federation president to Cardassia Prime. As a symbol of this deepening friendship, the U.S.S. Enterprise-E is tasked to carry the Cardassian ambassador to the Federation back home. For his part, Ambassador Elim Garak is working with Captain Jean-Luc Picard to oversee the diplomatic reception that will commemorate the last of Starfleet’s personnel finally leaving the homeworld. However, there are malevolent forces at work, who even now strive to “restore Cardassia to its proper place and glory,” and are willing to do anything to achieve their goal....

Order The Crimson Shadow from Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk



The Fall, Book Three: A Ceremony of Losses 
by David Mack (Interview at TrekCore.com)

THE NEEDS OF THE MANY
Despite heroic efforts by Thirishar ch’Thane, the Andorian species is headed for extinction. Its slow march toward oblivion has reached a tipping point, one from which there will be no hope of return.
THE NEEDS OF THE FEW
With countless lives at stake, the leaders of Andor, the Federation, and the Typhon Pact all scheme to twist the crisis to their political gain—at any price.
THE NEEDS OF THE ONE
Unwilling to be a mere bystander to tragedy, Doctor Julian Bashir risks everything to find a cure for the Andorians. But his courage will come at a terrible cost: his career, his freedom . . . and maybe his life.

Order A Cermemony of Losses from Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk



The Fall: Book Four: The Poisoned Chalice 
by James Swallow

One simple act, and the troubles of the United Federation of Planets have grown darker overnight. The mystery behind the heinous terrorist attack that has rocked the Federation to its core grows ever deeper, and William Riker finds himself beset by rumors and half-truths as the U.S.S. Titan is ordered back to Earth on emergency orders from the admiralty. Soon, Riker finds himself drawn into a game of political intrigue, bearing witness to members of Starfleet being detained—including people he considered friends—pending an investigation at the highest levels. And while Riker tries to navigate the corridors of power, Titan’s tactical officer, Tuvok, is given a series of clandestine orders that lead him into a gray world of secrets, lies, and deniable operations. Who can be trusted when the law falls silent and justice becomes a quest for revenge? For the crew of the U.S.S. Titan, the search for answers will become a battle for every ideal the Federation stands for...

Order The Poisoned Chalice from Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk


Look for reviews for each of the books of The Fall as each novel is released. Also, watch for interviews with each of the authors of The Fall series, exclusive to TrekCore.com!

Thursday, September 19, 2013

Fan Phenomena: Star Trek

Fan Phenomena: Star Trek
Edited by Bruce E. Drushel
Published by Intellect Books
106 pages
Read: September 8, 2013


Purchase from Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk

From the back cover:
From a decidedly inauspicious start as a low-rated television series in the 1960s that was cancelled after three seasons, Star Trek has grown to become a multi-billion-dollar industry of spin-off series, feature films and merchandise. Fuelling the ever-expanding franchise are some of the most rabid and loyal fans in the universe, known affectionately as Trekkies. Perhaps no other community so typifies fandom as the devoted aficionados of the Star Trek television series, motion pictures, novels, comic books and conventions. Indeed, in many respects, Star Trek fans created modern fan culture and continue to push its frontiers with elaborate fan-generated video productions, electronic fan fiction collectives and a proliferation of tribute sites in cyberspace.
In this anthology, a panel of rising and established popular culture scholars examines the phenomenon of Star Trek fan culture and its most compelling dimensions. The book explores such topics as the impact of the recent 'rebooting' of the iconic franchise on its fan base; the complicated and often contentious relationship between Star Trek and its lesbian and gay fans; the adaptation of Star Trek to other venues, including live theatre, social media and gaming; fan hyperreality, including parody and non-geek fandom; one iconic actor's social agenda; and alternative fan reactions to the franchise's villains. The resulting collection is both a snapshot and moving picture of the practices and attitudes of a fan culture that is arguably the world's best known and most misunderstood.
Striking a balanced tone, the contributors are critical yet respectful, acknowledging the uniquely close and enduring relationship between fans and the franchise while approaching it with appropriate objectivity, distance and scope. Accessible to a variety of audiences - from the newcomer to fan culture to those already well read on the subject - this book will be heralded by fans as well as serious scholars.

My thoughts:

Fan Phenomena is a series of books published by Intellect Books, in which essays about the fandom of a particular franchise are explored. Other titles in the series include Batman, Star Wars, Doctor Who, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and Twin Peaks. Star Trek, however, represents the quintessential fandom, an opinion shared by the editor of this collection.

Star Trek pioneered what we think of as "fandom" today.
The book itself is an interesting overview of a number of aspects of Star Trek fan culture. The essays are very respectful of Star Trek fandom, and the book never feels as though it is "looking down" on fans or fan culture. As a Star Trek fan myself, I found that I agreed with a lot of what the essays had to say. A number of issues are discussed, including an overview of the history of Star Trek fandom, the impact of the "reboot" of the franchise by J.J. Abrams and his team, and the role that computer-mediated communication has played in the Star Trek fan community.

Some parts of the book are critical of Star Trek and its role in our society, most notably in the chapter "A Utopia Denied: Star Trek and its Queer Fans." In this chapter, Bruce E. Drushel discusses the ways in which Star Trek has dropped the ball with regards to its portrayal of homosexuality and queer culture in the future. While race, gender, and ideology all get the Star Trek treatment (with sometimes mixed results), sexuality is often over looked, and the future often looks pretty heteronormative. A few exceptions exist (TNG's "The Outcast" and DS9's "Rejoined" come to mind), but for the most part, the article contends, Star Trek has let its queer fans down.

Galaxy Quest, called "the best Star Trek film" by some Trek fans.

Other aspects of fandom touched upon in this book include the live theatre performance, "Trek in the Park," an annual event held in Portland, Oregon (to which this fan would LOVE to go), as well as the cultural impact that George Takei has been able to harness through his use of social media. Another essay discusses the long tradition of fan-parodying, in the vein of films such as Galaxy Quest or Fanboys, and what this means to fans and fan culture at large. In "The Borg: Fan Pariah or Cultural Pillar?," Charles Evans Jones, Jr. presents a fascinating discussion about the Borg and what they may mean for our future, as well as presenting a number of fan opinions that may make the Borg into something more than the black and white villain, as we often tend to think of them. Finally, in "Lost in Orbit: Satellite Star Trek Fans," Bianca Spriggs talks to a number of "casual" Trek fans about their views on various topics in Star Trek and shows us that fans are everywhere.

Star Trek fans can indeed be found everywhere!
I enjoyed the various writers' approaches to each topic. Each of them obviously did a great deal of research, and in many cases, the discussion went in a direction I didn't expect. Star Trek and its fans represent a very diverse segment of our culture, and I would expect it to be very difficult to adequately cover such a wide-ranging topic. However, Fan Phenomena: Star Trek does a pretty good job in giving an overview of a large segment of fan culture.

Individually, each of the chapters in this book is a fascinating insight into a particular aspect of Star Trek fan culture. Taken together, they form a poignant snapshot of Star Trek fandom as a whole. The culture of Star Trek fans is a compelling and fun anthropological study, and Fan Phenomena: Star Trek does a good job of providing an introduction to it. While reading each chapter, I felt compelled to learn more than what was presented. Thankfully, the authors list their sources and recommendations for further reading on the subjects discussed. I think that this book is valuable for both the fan of Star Trek who wants to learn more as well as the more scholarly among us, and even those who live outside the Star Trek "bubble" who wish to learn exactly why this whole Star Trek thing is so big. Each section of the book has something interesting to say about Star Trek fans, and while I love being immersed in the world of Trek, it was fun to look at it with a somewhat more critical eye and examine it from the outside looking in.

My next read:

I've decided to put the second collection of S.C.E. stories on hold once again! Instead, look for my review of S.D. Perry's Deep Space Nine: Avatar, Book One, coming soon.



Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Interview: Una McCormack, author of The Fall: The Crimson Shadow!


We have another interview for you today over at TrekCore.com, this time with Una McCormack, author of a number of terrific Trek stories. Click here to read the interview, in which she talks about her upcoming novel, her thoughts on Trek in general, and her views on Cardassians and one dapper tailor in particular!

Her upcoming entry in The Fall, The Crimson Shadow, is available for preorder:

Click to purchase from Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk

See below for my reviews of other novels by Una McCormack:

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Hollow Men

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: The Never-Ending Sacrifice

Star Trek: Typhon Pact: Brinkmanship

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Revelation and Dust

Star Trek: The Fall
Revelation and Dust by David R. George III
Release date: August 27th, 2013
Read September 4th 2013


Previous book (24th Century Continuity): TNG: The Stuff of Dreams (e-book)
Previous book (DS9 Characters): Typhon Pact: Brinkmanship
Next book (The Fall): The Crimson Shadow

Click to purchase Revelation and Dust from Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk

Spoilers ahead for Revelation and Dust and The Fall!

From the back cover:
WELCOME TO THE NEW DEEP SPACE 9 
After the destruction of the original space station by a rogue faction of the Typhon Pact, Miles O’Brien and Nog have led the Starfleet Corps of Engineers in designing and constructing a larger, more advanced starbase in the Bajoran system. Now, as familiar faces such as Benjamin Sisko, Kasidy Yates, Ezri Dax, Odo, and Quark arrive at the new station, Captain Ro Laren will host various heads of state at an impressive dedication ceremony. The dignitaries include not only the leaders of allies—such as Klingon Chancellor Martok, Ferengi Grand Nagus Rom, the Cardassian castellan, and the Bajoran first minister—but also those of rival powers, such as the Romulan praetor and the Gorn imperator. But as Ro’s crew prepares to open DS9 to the entire Bajor Sector and beyond, disaster looms. A faction has already set in action a shocking plan that, if successful, will shake the Alpha and Beta Quadrants to the core. 
And what of Kira Nerys, lost aboard a runabout when the Bajoran wormhole collapsed? In the two years that have passed during construction of the new Deep Space 9, there have been no indications that the Celestial Temple, the Prophets, or Kira have survived. But since Ben Sisko once learned that the wormhole aliens exist nonlinearly in time, what does that mean with respect to their fate, or that of the wormhole...or of Kira herself?

My thoughts:

Revelation and Dust follows two separate story-lines that don't really meet until the very end of the book. In the first, the new Deep Space Nine is preparing to officially "open for business," hosting a dedication ceremony in which leaders from across the Alpha and Beta quadrants take part. However, a horrific attack disrupts this event, casting a pall over the celebration. The guests and inhabitants of DS9 are in danger, and the future of the Federation and Bajor are uncertain.

In the second story, we see Kira's experiences while with the Prophets in the wormhole. Much of this story seems to take place on Bajor of the past, with Kira taking on the role of Keev, a Bajoran who helped maintain an underground railroad freeing slaves from their masters. As her story evolves, we see parallels with Kira's life in the 24th century, as well as possible portents of things to come.

I've been anticipating a return to the 24th century narrative all year! While I really do enjoy novels set during The Original Series, I truly love the shared universe set up in the post-Nemesis era of Trek lit. So it was with a lot of excitement (and a little trepidation) that I read this, the first book in The Fall, a five-book miniseries. While Revelation and Dust started out a little slowly, I found myself really getting into it as the story unfolded. I often find that David R. George III's novels tend to focus more on character than on plot. While there is, of course, the Big Event™ (which I won't spoil here), where this novel really shines is in the characters' responses to what is going on. Most of the characters get a chance to shine: we see Captain Ro struggling with the burdens of command, Ben and Kassidy in their restored relationship and raising their daughter, Odo saddened both by the fact that Kira is missing and his being cut off from the Founders and the Great Link. One thing that made me especially happy was seeing Ezri and Julian finally hashing out their differences and reconciling their friendship in the wake of their break-up years earlier. Even President Nan Bacco has a sweet character moment shortly before she takes the stage at the dedication ceremony. It makes sense giving the reins of Deep Space Nine to DRGIII; after all, DS9 was the series that most exhibited excellent character development, and it is really great to see that tradition carried on here.

Kira's experiences with the Prophets seem unconnected to the other
events in the novel, but as usual, initial appearances are deceiving.
That's not to say that there aren't a few weak parts of this novel. As I mentioned above, the "Keev" parts of the story start out a little slow with no apparent tie to the main narrative. However, I suspected that there would be "real-world" consequences, and right at the end of the novel, it turns out that I was right. However, I can understand that some readers would feel that it was too long of a setup for the payoff that we are given.

One other small error that somewhat perplexes me: at the beginning of the novel, we are given a recounting of the events in the wormhole at the end of Raise the Dawn from Kira's perspective. Sisko's ship is described as being the U.S.S. Robinson and is even referred to as a Galaxy-class starship. However, in Raise the Dawn, Sisko had taken command of the U.S.S. Defiant and taken it into the wormhole. This seems an odd error for the author to make, especially seeing as he penned both novels! However, it is a relatively small mistake and doesn't have a lot of bearing on the novel as a whole.

The new Deep Space Nine - echoes of the original, but wholly unique and brand-new.
Finally, Revelation and Dust introduces us to the new Deep Space Nine. In stark contrast to the previous station, DS9 2.0 is shiny and state-of-the-art. Much larger than its predecessor, and much more sophisticated, I think that this new station will serve well as the setting for many adventures to come. I look forward to continuing to explore it along with the characters in the books and my fellow readers.

Final thoughts:

In writing Revelation and Dust, David R. George had a number of things he had to accomplish: introduce the new Deep Space Nine, catch us up with where the characters are, and set The Fall in motion. I think that he accomplishes these goals well, for the most part. A few small hiccups don't detract from the overall enjoyment of this novel. The twists and turns and surprising reveals at the end of the book make me very curious about what is to come. This novel's setup has certainly made me eager to read the next book in the series. As always, it's difficult to review this novel in a vacuum; as the first book in a five-book series, I believe that to be a fair assessment, it should be considered in the context of the other books that comprise the series. Look for a review of the overall series The Fall after all of the books have been released!

Further resources:

TrekBBS review and discussion thread for Revelation and Dust
Interview: David R. George III on Trekcore.com
Podcast: Literary Treks 36: An Archduke Ferdinand Moment - David R. George III discusses Revelation and Dust

Also by David R. George III:

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Mission Gamma, Book One: Twilight (2002)
Star Trek: The Lost Era: Serpents Among the Ruins (2003)
Worlds of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: The Dominion: Olympus Descending (2005)
Star Trek: Typhon Pact: Plagues of Night (2012)
Star Trek: Typhon Pact: Raise the Dawn (2012)
Star Trek: The Original Series: Allegiance in Exile (2013)
Star Trek: The Lost Era: One Constant Star (2014)
Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Sacraments of Fire (2015)
Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Ascendance (2016)
Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: The Long Mirage (2017)

The Fall

Revelation and Dust
by David R. George III
The Crimson Shadow by Una McCormack
A Ceremony of Losses by David Mack
The Poisoned Chalice by James Swallow
Peaceable Kingdoms by Dayton Ward

My next read:

I recently read a collection of essays about Star Trek fandom, which have been collected in a volume entitled Fan Phenomena: Star Trek. Look for my review soon!


Saturday, September 7, 2013

Another Gorgeous Cover! The Fall: The Poisoned Chalice

The cover for this winter's The Poisoned Chalice has been released, and it's another beautiful one! Featuring the U.S.S. Titan, The Poisoned Chalice is set to be released at the end of November. The back cover blurb follows.


One simple act, and the troubles of the United Federation of Planets have grown darker overnight. The mystery behind the heinous terrorist attack that has rocked the Federation to its core grows ever deeper, and William Riker finds himself beset by rumors and half-truths as the U.S.S. Titan is ordered back to Earth on emergency orders from the admiralty. Soon, Riker finds himself drawn into a game of political intrigue, bearing witness to members of Starfleet being detained—including people he considered friends—pending an investigation at the highest levels. And while Riker tries to navigate the corridors of power, Titan’s tactical officer, Tuvok, is given a series of clandestine orders that lead him into a gray world of secrets, lies, and deniable operations. Who can be trusted when the law falls silent and justice becomes a quest for revenge? For the crew of the U.S.S. Titan, the search for answers will become a battle for every ideal the Federation stands for.

The Fall: The Poisoned Chalice can be pre-ordered from Amazon.com, Amazon.ca, and Amazon.co.uk by clicking the links. I'm definitely looking forward to this one!